How to Cook Christmas Dinner: Yorkshire Puddings

How to Make Yorkshire Puddings

I have a confession: I don't actually make the Yorkshire Puddings in my house. I live with a Yorkshireman who is very particular about them, so I am not allowed to meddle in this part of a roast. We should all play to our strengths, after all. I have, however, plundered his knowledge so I can share some tips and tricks with you for this very important part of Christmas Dinner. Frozen Yorkshire Puddings are an abomination, and you should go without rather than have them grace your plate on the big day, but I can see the appeal; making Yorkshire Puddings involves hot fat, some tricky manoeuvring and a little bit of patience, all of which is quite difficult just when everything else is coming to the boil. They are, however, quite simple in design - just three ingredients (plus oil) and a fast cooking time. I've got some extra tips coming on Monday on how to fit everything together so you don't get in a flap, but for now, here's how to cook your Yorkshire Puddings: 

  • Stick to the Formula - 1 cup of flour, 1 cup of milk & 1 egg. Every time. We use a standard sized mug & a large egg, which makes more than enough batter for 12 Yorkshire Puddings. 
  • Whizz it Up! If you have a hand blender or electric whisk, now is the time to use it. The more air you can get into the batter, the better your puddings will be. Mix until smooth and then keep on mixing. Alternatively, prepare to put in a lot of elbow grease. 
  • Use a Jug - I know it's extra washing up, but pouring the batter into a jug will make the whole process so much easier (and a little safer, too). 
  • Get it Nice & Hot - This is the tricky part so it's time to concentrate! Place a cupcake tin (or Yorkshire Pudding pan, if you have one!) onto the hob and turn them on so it's heating through. Pour a good amount of oil into each hole, and wait until it just starts to smoke. This is when you should pour in your batter - there should be enough so each hole is about level. Turn off the heat and transfer it to the oven, which should be heated to 200C
  • Don't Open the Door - As with sponge cakes and souffles, keeping the door closed will allow your Yorkshires to rise nicely and go a nice brown colour. This is where a little organisation comes in, because ideally you don't want to open the door for the 10-15 minutes the Yorkshire Puddings will take to cook. 
  • Enjoy! Once they're ready, just pop them out of the oven and serve. Cover in gravy, dip in sauce, or just eat them as they are! 

How to Make Yorkshire Puddings