Easy Chicken Noodle Soup

Easy Chicken Noodle Soup // Amy Elizabeth

Apparently it is scientifically proven that soup will make you feel better when you’re ill. And none more so than chicken noodle soup, in my opinion. This soup is surprisingly simple to make, even if you’re a little under the weather, and the combination of comforting noodles, hot broth and a little spicy kick at the end is sure to cure what ails you. I’m not usually a big soup eater – I don’t find it really fills me up, so I get hungry almost straight away – but sometimes it’s exactly what you’re craving, especially when it’s so miserable out.

Easy Chicken Noodle Soup // Amy Elizabeth

This soup is totally adaptable, too. Use up some of your favourite vegetables by throwing them in the mix, or swap out the rice vermicelli noodles for more substantial egg ones. You could even use small pasta shapes in place of the noodles (but don’t you dare think about leaving out the carbs altogether). Skip the chilli flakes when you’re making the stock for a mellower flavour, or garnish with fresh chillies or hot sauce if you like it fiery.  Want to make this even easier? Use the meat and bones from one of those supermarket rotisserie chickens to make your stock and soup. All that said, you must eat this under a blanket whilst wearing pyjamas and, preferably, with your favourite trashy TV show playing. There’s no negotiating on that part, sorry. 

Spicy Slow Cooker Chicken Noodle Soup
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For the broth
  1. bones of one whole roast chicken
  2. 1 large onion, peeled and chopped in half
  3. 1 large carrot, chopped into 2-3 pieces
  4. 2-3 garlic cloves, peeled and slightly smashed
  5. 1-2 tsp. dried thyme
  6. 1-2 tsp. chilli flakes
  7. salt and pepper
  8. 2 litres of water (or enough to cover the contents above)
For the soup
  1. shredded meat from 1 whole roast chicken
  2. 2 carrots, diced
  3. handful on mangetout, sliced
  4. 4 nests of rice vermicelli noodles
  5. fresh parsley, finely chopped (optional)
Instructions
  1. Pop all of the ingredients for the broth into the slow cooker, making sure the contents are covered by the water (add more if not) and cook for 5 hours on high or 10 hours on low.
  2. Strain into a large bowl and rest in the fridge overnight.
  3. Remove as much of the fat from the top of the broth as possible (it should be solid after the night in the fridge).
  4. Pour the broth into a large saucepan and bring to a simmer. Add the leek and carrot and cook until just going tender.
  5. Add the rice noodles and the chicken, cooking for a further 2-3 minutes until the noodles have softened and the chicken is warmed through.
  6. Ladle into bowls and garnish with parsley, if using. Slurp noisily when eating.
Notes
  1. The finished soup can be frozen in individual portions and reheated when needed, either in a saucepan or by blasting in the microwave in one minute intervals until piping hot.
Adapted from Smitten Kitchen
Adapted from Smitten Kitchen
Amy Elizabeth http://amyliz.co.uk/

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Kimchi & Prawn Egg Fried Rice

Kimchi & Prawn Egg Fried Rice // Amy Elizabeth

After reading Rachel’s post on Asian ingredients, I was inspired to raid my local Asian supermarket on Friday night. And by raid, I mean spend an obscene amount of money on kimchi and kewpie mayonnaise. So, I would argue that this isn’t so much a recipe as the result of me throwing a bunch of new ingredients into a pan and hoping for the best. Which sometimes is how the greatest dinners come together (and, in this case, a couple of leftover lunches, too).

There is nothing authentic about this dish, but it was filling and heart-warming, and slightly sour from the kimchi and slightly spicy from the sriracha, and colourful and basically everything I wanted to eat right at that moment, so maybe it is also the thing that you want to eat right at *this* moment, too, and I couldn’t not share it. 

As with all food of this nature, you can make it your own by mixing up the vegetables and protein (some peppers and pork might work nicely!) or, instead of scrambling the egg into the dish, you could serve one fried or poached on the top. Just do what you feel, spice it up nicely and eat it in big forkfuls from a bowl whilst reading a book or watching a trashy TV show. Live your best life, is what I’m saying. 

P.S. For Leeds pals, I bought my kimchi and gochujang (and a whole host of other fun ingredients) at Taste the Orient on Vicar Lane, which has been my go-to for Asian ingredients for a while now. I also picked up some gyoza skins in the freezer section to make these Pork & Chilli Gyoza so it was a winning weekend for food! 

Kimchi & Prawn Egg Fried Rice
Serves 2
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Ingredients
  1. 1 leek, sliced
  2. 1/2 cup mushrooms, sliced
  3. 3-4 spring onions, sliced (plus more for garnish)
  4. 1/3 cup kimchi, sliced into smaller pieces
  5. 1 clove of garlic, finely chopped
  6. 200g raw prawns
  7. 500g cooked rice (I used two of those microwave basmati packets)
  8. 2 tsp. gochujang
  9. 2 tbsp. soy sauce (or more to taste)
  10. 1 tsp. fish sauce
  11. 2 eggs
  12. Sriracha & kewpie mayonnaise, to serve
Instructions
  1. Heat some oil in a large frying pan over a medium heat and add the leek, mushrooms, spring onion and kimchi. Fry for 3-4 minutes until the leeks and mushrooms are starting to soften.
  2. Add the prawns and garlic and cook for a further few minutes until prawns have gone pink.
  3. Stir through the gochujang, and then tip in the rice. Add the soy sauce and fish sauce, and stir together until everything is mixed through. Taste and add more soy sauce if needed.
  4. Make a little space at the side of the frying pan by pushing the rice to one side, and crack in both eggs and mix to scramble slightly. As the eggs start to cook, stir them through the rest of the ingredients until evenly distributed throughout the dish.
  5. Serve immediately, with extra spring onions and sriracha and kewpie mayonnaise to taste.
Amy Elizabeth http://amyliz.co.uk/

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Tomato & Orzo Soup

Tomato and Orzo Soup // Amy Elizabeth

It’s soup season. I like to think I’ll be sipping my soup from a mug whilst dressed in autumnal knits and staring out over a beautiful foggy landscape, but more realistically I’m eating it al desko because it’s too cold to go on a walk at lunchtime. But, however you’re eating it, this soup is delicious and warming. It’s got all the classic flavours of a good tomato soup, but with the addition of some orzo for a bit of texture and some more substance. Orzo’s a bit of a new obsession of mine; I’ve been using it instead of rice in risottos and it’s kind of the best. As with all soups, it keeps well in the fridge or freezer until you need it, and is best served with plenty of cheese on top, and crusty bread to dip. It’s almost enough to make these colder temperatures worth it, isn’t it? 

Tomato and Orzo Soup // Amy Elizabeth

Tomato and Orzo Soup
Serves 6
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Ingredients
  1. olive oil
  2. 1 onion, finely chopped
  3. 3 gloves garlic, crushed or finely grated
  4. 3 x 400g can chopped tomatoes
  5. 1 tbsp. dried oregano
  6. pinch dried chilli flakes, to taste
  7. 1 tsp. caster sugar
  8. salt and pepper, to taste
  9. double cream, to taste
  10. 150g orzo
  11. parmesan, to serve
Instructions
  1. Heat the olive oil in a large, heavy-bottomed saucepan over a medium heat. Add the onions and fry until soft and fragrant.
  2. Add the garlic and fry for a minute more, stirring regularly and checking the garlic doesn't start to brown. Lower the heat, if needed.
  3. Add the chopped tomatoes, oregano , chilli flakes, caster sugar, salt & pepper. Mix together and simmer for 15 minutes.
  4. Meanwhile, cook the orzo according to packet instructions. Drain and set aside.
  5. Stir the double cream into the tomato soup - a generous swirl should sort you out but taste as you go so it's just how you like it!
  6. Stir in the orzo and serve with freshly grated parmesan and black pepper.
Amy Elizabeth http://amyliz.co.uk/

Tomato and Orzo Soup // Amy Elizabeth

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Pomegranate & Walnut Chicken Stew

pomegranatewalnutchickenstew

I’m sure I’m not the only basic bitch around here who is a big fan of autumn. After a rather disappointing summer, it is a joy to be experiencing a season who knows its stuff, isn’t it? The crispness in the air in the mornings. The crunchy leaves under foot. This is the very best time of year, for me. The sun is still shining more often than not, but it’s still perfectly acceptable to turn your attention to comfort food. Because, of course, the joy of the changing seasons is so much in the change in menu, is it not? Roast dinners with plenty of gravy, freshly baked apple pies, stews and big hunks of crusty bread. The food of autumn is like wrapping yourself in a snuggly blanket. I have some old favourites that I always like to bring out at this time of year – sausage and bean casserole, my fail safe chicken curry and these pork, apple & cheddar meatballs – but it’s always nice to try something a little bit different. 

pomegranatewalnutchickenstew2

I made this pomegranate & walnut chicken stew for a dinner party of sorts, served up alongside some other middle Eastern inspired dishes, but I actually think it’s a pretty good weeknight meal. It’s warming and cosy, but with the bright crunch of the pomegranate seeds doesn’t feel too wintery. Plus, it reheats pretty well in the microwave (sans pomegranate seeds) if you want to take the leftovers in for lunch the next day. The combination of toasted walnuts and sweet pomegranate molasses is enough to brighten even the rainiest of days, and you can easily double (or triple) if you’re feeding a big group. Serve with rice or fresh flatbreads, and maybe some honey roasted carrots if you’re after some more vegetables in you life. 

Pomegranate & Walnut Chicken Stew
Serves 3
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Ingredients
  1. 300g walnut halves
  2. 1 onion, finely chopped
  3. 4 chicken breasts, cubed
  4. 400ml chicken stock
  5. 50ml pomegranate molasses
  6. 2 tbsp. honey
  7. 1/2 tsp. turmeric
  8. pinch of cinnamon & nutmeg
  9. salt & pepper to taste
  10. pomegranate seeds & chopped parsley, to serve (optional)
Instructions
  1. Toast the walnut halves in a frying pan over a medium heat. Allow to cool and then blend in a food processor until you have a fine meal.
  2. In a large saucepan or casserole dish, fry the onions and chicken until the onions have softened and the chicken has started to brown.
  3. Add the chicken stock and bring to the boil.
  4. Stir in the pomegranate molasses, honey, turmeric, cinnamon and nutmeg followed by the ground walnuts. Season to taste.
  5. Reduce heat and simmer for 15-25 minutes until the sauce has thickened and the chicken is cooked through.
  6. Serve with basmati rice or flatbreads (or both!), and scatter the pomegranate seeds & parsley on top.
Adapted from Minimalist Baker
Adapted from Minimalist Baker
Amy Elizabeth http://amyliz.co.uk/

 

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Prawn & Chorizo Puy Lentil Salad

Prawn & Chorizo Puy Lentil Salad // Amy Elizabeth

I’m always on the lookout for new recipes to make, and this one came at me at a very unusual time. You wouldn’t usually expect hen dos to be a source of foodie inspiration, but I found myself very well fed at my friend Katie’s hen do a couple of weeks ago, which lead to mixing up this salad for lunches this week. I am always a little apprehensive about hen dos, and always proved wrong in my apprehension when I actually attend them. This one was really lovely; it really does my heart good to spend time with women – even when they are women that I don’t really know all that well. Between bottles of prosecco, a little life-drawing (!) and a kitchen dance party in Pikachu onesies, it was a wonderful way to spend a weekend.

Prawn & Chorizo Puy Lentil Salad // Amy Elizabeth

Cooking for 15 is no easy feat at the best of times, so I was particularly impressed by bridesmaid Millie’s kitchen skills as she whipped up a range of delicious dishes for us to feast on – including a warm lentil and chorizo salad for lunch before the aforementioned life drawing class. Served with lashings of pinot grigio and a pile of garlic bread, it was the perfect way to feed a hungry crowd, and it worked just as well scaled back for my lunchboxes this week. And since it’s technically a salad, albeit a warm one, I can kid myself that this means I’m making summer dishes already! 

Prawn & Chorizo Puy Lentil Salad // Amy Elizabeth

Prawn & Chorizo Puy Lentil Salad
Serves 3
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Ingredients
  1. 100g Italian-style salad leaves
  2. 250g cooked puy lentils
  3. 200g chorizo, sliced
  4. 180g uncooked king prawns
  5. 150g feta, crumbled
  6. olive oil
  7. balsamic vinegar
Instructions
  1. Put the puy lentils, salad leaves and feta in a large bowl and place to one side.
  2. In a small frying pan, gently fry the chorizo over a medium heat until browned and sizzling. Tip into the bowl along with most of the oil that's been released by the chorizo.
  3. Pop the prawns into the pan and fry until cooked through. Add to the bowl.
  4. Pour over a generous lug of olive oil and balsamic vinegar, and toss together all the ingredients until well-mixed.
  5. Serve warm with crusty bread.
Notes
  1. As this is a salad, all quantities are approximate and can be adjusted for taste or for whatever you have in the cupboard.
Amy Elizabeth http://amyliz.co.uk/

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Spaghetti Vongole

Spaghetti Vongole // Amy Elizabeth

There’s something about the chill outside that makes me want to indulge in fresh, light dishes. I’m trying to trick myself that it’s Spring already. I know we’re supposed to be living in the moment, but when the moment involves harsh winds and not being able to leave the house without 327 layers, then I think I’m allowed to wish for the lighter days and (slightly) warmer temperatures of Spring. This is the sort of dish that you should eat at a beachfront restaurant whilst wearing over-sized sunglasses and white linen, not curled up in front of the TV under a blanket, but sometimes needs must.

Spaghetti Vongole // Amy Elizabeth

The thing is, clams are in season right now – which means we’ve got to make the most of them whilst we can. I’m obsessed with all things seafood – whether it’s a big bowl of plump mussels, a decadent dish of lobster, a pile of juicy prawns or these sweet little clams, I am so there. I think a lot of people are put off from eating seafood at home because it seems a little tricky, but that reputation couldn’t be further from the truth. A little know-how is all you need, and this guide on how to clean and prepare clams will set you up perfectly for making this dish. 

Spaghetti Vongole // Amy Elizabeth

Spaghetti Vongole
Serves 2
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Ingredients
  1. 300g clams
  2. 200g spaghetti
  3. 10g butter
  4. big splash of olive oil
  5. 2 cloves of garlic, finely chopped
  6. 1 red chilli, finely chopped
  7. 1 small glass of dry white wine
  8. small bunch of flat leaf parsley, roughly chopped
  9. zest and juice of 1/2 lemon
Instructions
  1. Rinse the clams in running water and scrub with a stiff brush if needed. Put them in a bowl and cover with salted water. Leave for a couple of hours before draining and rinsing to get rid of any grit.
  2. Cook the spaghetti in a pan of boiling water with plenty of salt, until al dente.
  3. Meanwhile, heat the butter and oil in a large frying pan over a medium heat until softened.
  4. Add the clams and the wine. Cover and cook for a couple of minutes until most of the clams have opened. Pick out any that are unopened and discard.
  5. Drain the spaghetti and add to the clam pan. Toss together and heat through for a minute.
  6. Stir through the parsley, lemon zest and juice and serve.
Amy Elizabeth http://amyliz.co.uk/

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Blood Orange and Mozzarella Salad

Blood Orange and Mozzarella Salad // Amy Elizabeth

In summer, I am all about the seasonal produce. I cannot get enough of salad, berries, fresh fruits and delicious produce. I pile my basket high at the greengrocers, and can barely get through it all, such is my greed and excitement. In winter, however? Not so much. I’m not saying that root vegetables are boring but… well, that is what I’m saying. It’s just so much harder to get excited about a carrot than it is a strawberry or raspberry. Maybe it’s because so much ‘seasonal’ produce in winter is actually available, and pretty tasty, all year around. There’s not much difference between a carrot in January and a carrot in June.

Blood Orange and Mozzarella Salad // Amy Elizabeth

There are exceptions to the rule, of course, and it’s those that get me excited to go into the kitchen during winter and make up something new. Before Christmas, pomegranates were my jam and I was putting those delicious seeds onto everything in sight. Now? It’s blood oranges. They are just the most beautiful colour, and they could not be tastier than they are right now. There’s something about their limited availability that makes them that much more appealing – as in dating, as in the kitchen in this instance. Is this paragraph getting weird? I’m okay with it. When my love affair with blood oranges ends, it will be time to get re-acquainted with the beauty of rhubarb, but until them I am making the most of these zingy little fruits and everything you can do with them. 

Blood Orange and Mozzarella Salad // Amy Elizabeth

This salad is a true thing of beauty. It’s got the freshness and the rich flavour of the blood orange, the subtle creaminess of the mozzarella, the saltiness of the proscuitto and the pepperiness of the rocket. It’s basically a flavour party in your mouth and everyone’s invited. I’m not usually one for chowing down on salads during the winter – I am all about making the most of comfort food during the cold season – but this is most definitely worth getting a little bit healthy for. It’s my little January present to you. 

Blood Orange and Mozzarella Salad
Serves 1
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Ingredients
  1. 1 blood orange
  2. 2 slices of proscuitto
  3. 1/2 ball of mozzarella
  4. 1 big handful of rocket
  5. olive oil
  6. balsamic vinegar
Instructions
  1. Using a knife, remove the skin from the blood orange and slice thickly.
  2. Place the rocket on a plate, and scatter over strips of proscuitto and slices of blood orange. Tear over the mozzarella.
  3. Drizzle over a light splash of olive oil and balsamic vinegar.
  4. Tuck in!
Amy Elizabeth http://amyliz.co.uk/

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Pork, Apple & Cheddar Meatballs in Creamy Mustard Sauce

Pork, Apple and Cheddar Meatballs in Creamy Mustard Sauce // Amy Elizabeth

Is anyone else sick of the stormy weather we’ve been having? I know it’s terribly British to speak about the weather, but it feels like it just takes over at this time of year. It’s so grim outside that all I want to do is eat comfort food and hibernate. Battling the wind and rain to even go for a cosy drink at the local pub feels like an ordeal, which makes me feel very anti-social. Of course, the solution to being anti-social in this instance is to invite others round to your house for an evening of board games, good food and plenty of wine. That way, you don’t have to go outside in the rain, and you still get to see your friends. It’s really a win-win. 

A dish like these meatballs is perfect for a cosy evening in, whether it’s for two people or twenty (although I’d think twice about catering for twenty people, if I were you…). Mixing up the meatballs is oddly satisfying, and the combination of the sharp cheddar and the sweet apple is a subtle but very pleasing flavour. You can serve them anyway you want, but at this time of year I think they’re probably best with piles of creamy mashed potatoes, some steamed greens and a creamy mustard sauce. All you need to do is pop on your slippers, and you’ll feel warmer than you ever have done before – even if it is hailing outside… 

Pork, Apple and Cheddar Meatballs in Creamy Mustard Sauce // Amy Elizabeth

Pork, Apple & Cheddar Meatballs in Creamy Mustard Sauce
Serves 4
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For the meatballs
  1. 500g pork mince
  2. 1/2 onion, coarsely grated
  3. 1 Granny Smith apple, peeled and coarsely grated
  4. 150g cheddar, grated
  5. salt and pepper
  6. 1 egg, beaten
  7. 75g dried breadcrumbs
For the sauce
  1. knob of butter
  2. 1 tbsp. flour
  3. 300ml chicken stock
  4. splash of Worcestershire sauce
  5. 1 tbsp. wholegrain mustard
  6. 1 tsp. runny honey
  7. salt & pepper
  8. 50ml double cream
For the meatballs
  1. Preheat the oven to 180C and line a baking tray with foil.
  2. In a mixing bowl, combine the pork mince, apple, cheddar, onion, salt & pepper, egg and breadcrumbs.
  3. Using your hands, shape the mixture into 16 meatballs and place on the prepared tray.
  4. Bake for 15-18 minutes until cooked through and golden on the outside.
For the sauce
  1. Whilst the meatballs are cooking, melt the butter in a small saucepan. Stir in the flour until you have a smooth paste.
  2. Gradually add the chicken stock, stirring continuously to avoid lumps.
  3. Stir in the mustard, Worcestershire sauce and honey. Season with salt & pepper.
  4. Simmer for 10-15 minutes until the sauce has thickened. Taste and adjust flavours and seasoning where necessary.
  5. Remove from the heat and stir in the cream.
Amy Elizabeth http://amyliz.co.uk/
Pork, Apple and Cheddar Meatballs in Creamy Mustard Sauce // Amy Elizabeth

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Spaghetti Aglio Olio

Spaghetti Aglio Olio

Spaghetti Aglio Olio

How many of us make an effort in the kitchen when there’s someone else involved, a loved one, a guest, a friend, but not when we are alone? I hear confessions of oven chips and ready meals, because it’s too much hassle just for one, far too often. If that is you, I hope that this dish will change things for you. This dish is a love letter to yourself, best enjoyed alone with a glass of wine and your own thoughts. It is simple and quick enough that cooking for one seems like no effort at all, but it requires your full attention. Parsley needs to be methodically chopped until fine. Spaghetti needs to be tested, to be sure it’s al dente. Pans need to be watched in case the oil overheats and the garlic becomes bitter. You can customise it to your exact specifications, just the way you like it. You’re cooking for yourself, after all. Whether it’s a grating of Parmesan, a little lemon zest or a handful of prawns, make it your favourite way. You deserve this dish. If you don’t love and nourish yourself, then who will? 

Spaghetti Aglio Olio

Spaghetti Aglio Olio

Spaghetti Aglio Olio
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Ingredients
  1. 100g spaghetti
  2. salt
  3. 3 cloves of garlic
  4. bunch of parsley
  5. pinch of dried chilli flakes
  6. 3 tbsp. olive oil
Instructions
  1. Bring a pan of salted water to the boil and cook the spaghetti until al dente.
  2. Meanwhile, finely chop the garlic and parsley. Add to a frying pan with the chilli flakes and oil. Heat gently until the garlic has just started to turn a light golden colour. Keep an eye on it, if you overcook then the garlic will turn bitter.
  3. Lightly drain the spaghetti so there's still some water in the pan. Add to the warm oil and stir together.
  4. Serve with a glass of wine and a grating of parmesan, if you fancy it.
Amy Elizabeth http://amyliz.co.uk/

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Easy Pork & Chilli Gyoza

Easy Pork Gyoza

Do you know when you get an idea in your head, and you can’t rest until you see it through? These gyozas were one of those ideas, for me. I love gyozas of all flavours, but they always seemed like they would be tricky to make from scratch so I’d relegated them to a restaurant-only dish. However, after reading Lil’s post on them, I got it into my head that I needed to try it for myself and, after a trip to the Asian supermarket for wrappers (they were in the frozen section!) and a read of this recipe, I was armed and ready to go. And, you know what? They were easier than I thought. Almost therapeutic to make: a little like origami. 

Ever since, I’ve been making big batches of these, and freezing them for mid-week dinners. I serve them with a steaming hot bowl of noodles and stir-fried veg, with some sesame oil and soy sauce. A few sesame seeds never did any harm, either. They’re so satisfying and, after the initial time outlay, so quick and easy. It’s something a little bit different and, although my dumplings will never be as good as Dorshi’s, they’re pretty darn tasty, too. 

Easy Pork Gyoza

A word of warning: these will stick to the steamer! I used my standard metal steamer (the one I use for veggies), and the first time I had a bit of a disaster, with the wrappers all ripping open, leaving everything a bit of a mess. The next time I greased the steam with a little bit of olive oil before putting in the gyoza, and there were no problems! I’m sure there are more technical ways of doing it, or equipment you can buy (one of those bamboo ones, perhaps?!) but I was working with what I had!

Oh, you can also stick the steamed gyoza in a frying pan if you want a slightly crispier finish, but I like them just steamed. 

Easy Pork Gyoza

Easy Pork & Chilli Gyozas
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Ingredients
  1. 1 pack of gyoza wrappers (around 50)
  2. 500g pork mince
  3. 1 chilli, finely chopped
  4. 2 garlic cloves, finely chopped
  5. 2 spring onions, finely chopped
  6. 1 tsp. grated ginger
  7. 1 tsp. fish sauce
  8. 1 tbsp. soy sauce
  9. water
Instructions
  1. Mix together the mince, chilli, garlic, spring onions, ginger, fish sauce and soy sauce until well incorporated. You want an even mix of all the ingredients and flavours in each dumpling!
  2. Place around a tablespoon in the centre of each wrapper. Wet the edges and fold over until sealed.
  3. Wet the sealed edge and pleat gently all the way along.
  4. Set on a baking tray lined with baking parchment. Try not to place them too close together, as they'll stick together!
  5. Repeat until all the mixture or all the wrappers are used up.
  6. Steam for 12-14 minutes until the centres are piping hot.
Notes
  1. You can freeze the gyozas by placing the baking tray(s) in the freezer - make sure the gyozas aren't touching as they'll stick together and potentially rip when cooked. Once they're frozen, you can transfer to bags or tupperware. You can cook the gyoza from frozen - just steam for 15-17 minutes and make sure the insides are hot before eating.
Adapted from Persephone H
Adapted from Persephone H
Amy Elizabeth http://amyliz.co.uk/

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